NEWS

Professor Christos Thomas Georgakis is one of the worlds's leading wave researchers. He is studying how the sea's movement impacts oil platforms in the North Sea. The aim is to reduce inspection and maintenance costs. (Photo: Lars Kruse)

2018.01.12 | AU Engineering

New knowledge about waves to keep oil platforms operational for longer

Open-sea trials will reveal to researchers how waves arise, develop and impact the surroundings. This will make it possible to keep oil platforms in the North Sea operational for longer.

Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen, Science and Technology, and Development Manager Kasper Lund, Google Aarhus, officially opened the ORBIT Lab on 13 December. Photo: Martin Gravgaard
There was plenty of opportunity to try out technologies, and students and entrepreneurs were on standby to show off their innovations. Photo: Martin Gravgaard
“We’ll solve the problems of today with the technology of tomorrow,” said ‘Lab Commander’ Kasper Løvborg Jensen at the opening. Photo: Martin Gravgaard
“Aarhus University’s motto is <em>Solidum petit in profundis</em> (We seek solid ground in the depths). The ORBIT Lab aims for exactly the opposite. You’ll reach up to the stars, where the sky knows no boundaries and neither does the cloud,” said Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen at the opening.

2017.12.17 | AU Engineering

How we solve the problems of today with the technology of tomorrow

The stage was set for inspiring ideas at the official opening of the ORBIT Lab on Wednesday 13 December, when Aarhus University staff and students were invited along with representatives from the business sector – and many interesting technological innovation projects were displayed.

"In this project, we have started a journey to construct a cognitive computing system as a proof of concept," says Associate Professor Farshad Moradi, Department of Engineering, Aarhus University.

2017.12.14 | AU Engineering

Building a computer like a human brain: a technological revolution

For decades computers have been growing exponentially in computational power. However, the current technology is nearing a threshold: computing simply requires too much power.

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