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Curved buildings are difficult. They require advanced supporting structures and expensive facade solutions. Or do they? This tower could be the first step on the way to more shapes in the building industry of the future. Two engineering students have built a 10-metre-high tower made of fibreglass-reinforced concrete. And it can support itself. (Photo: AU Engineering archive)

2016.03.01 | Public / media, AU Engineering

Students construct self-supporting tower

Two engineering students have worked out how to make curved buildings using facade plates with no other supporting structure. This can bring the building industry closer to shapes that have previously been impossible.

In the coming years, researchers will gain new knowledge about how to integrate gas into the Danish energy system. Pictured here is Associate Professor Lars Ditlev Mørck Ottosen, Department of Engineering (Photo: Lars Kruse)

2016.02.23 | Public / media, AU Engineering

More green gas on the way

In the coming years, Aarhus University will contribute with new knowledge about how to ensure better integration of gas in Denmark’s energy supply for the benefit of the climate. Innovation Fund Denmark is investing DKK 18.6 million in the project.

More stairs and not so many elevators. Researchers have been busy measuring and carrying out fieldwork among the residents of a 12-storey building to study the extent to which it is possible to change energy behaviour with the help of simple information. (Photo: Hasle Photo)
The elevator experiment is part of the Virtual Power Plant project. Here researchers are working to design intelligent buildings that automatically respond in the most sustainable way to the power requirements of consumers. Pictured here is Rune Hylsberg Jacobsen. (Photo: Anders Trærup)

2016.02.09 | Public / media, AU Engineering

Simple technology makes elevators ‘green’

Having a guilty conscience about the climate makes us choose to take the stairs instead of the energy-devouring elevator – at least to a certain extent. This is the conclusion of a research project involving almost 200 residents in a 12-storey building in Aarhus.

What do you do with outdated wind turbine blades and aircraft made of expensive fibreglass? You cut them up into pieces and bury them in the ground. Or possibly in the future, you add a chemical substance that can separate the glass from the plastic fibres so they can be recycled. This is the common goal for researchers and companies in Innovation Fund Denmark’s new project called DreamWind. (Photo: Vestas archives)
There will be plenty of activity in the laboratories in the coming years when researchers develop new materials that make recycling easier. Pictured here is Associate Professor Mogens Hinge, Department of Engineering. (Photo: Anders Trærup)

2016.02.04 | Public / media, AU Engineering

Wind turbine blades of the future will be recyclable

In the DreamWind project, researchers will develop a chemical substance that will make it possible to separate composite materials from each other. This means that the large and expensive fibreglass components from wind turbines will be recyclable in the future.