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The building laboratory at AU Engineering has in recent weeks been the epicentre of true copies of some of the most powerful earthquakes in history. All the vibrations come from a specially built simulator. Pictured here (from left) are Jakob Gam, Andreas Poulsen and Søren Truelsegaard – all engineering students at Aarhus University. (Photo: Jakob Gam)
Well-insulated new shelters have become popular as a replacement for cotton tents or tin huts in emergency areas. They can house refugees for up to 15 years and provide protection from heat and frost. But can they also withstand an earthquake? (Photo: Evershelter)

2016.06.28 | AU Engineering

Students recreate earthquakes in the laboratory

A group of engineering students has built an earthquake simulator that can very precisely recreate historical earthquakes in the laboratory. They can now carry out full-scale safety tests on small buildings.

The Grundfos hall of residence at the Port of Aarhus is no ordinary building. It uses energy when there is plenty of solar and wind power, and it ‘hibernates’ when the power in the energy grid comes from fossil fuels. (Photo: Henrik Olsen)
A technical room has been set up in the basement of the building, with equipment that provides monitoring of the energy consumption in all the apartments at intervals of a few seconds. Pictured here are Associate Professor Steffen Petersen (right) and PhD student Michael Dahl Knudsen – both from the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. (Photo: Henrik Olsen)

2016.06.22 | AU Engineering

Intelligent buildings make our energy consumption greener

It is possible to shift our energy consumption to times of the day when there is plenty of power from renewable sources such as solar and wind. At least to a certain extent if we invest in technology for intelligent management of our buildings. This is the conclusion of researchers in connection with the completion of one of the world’s most…

Aarhus University is hosting a major scientific conference on 26–29 June to focus on the role of technology in the agriculture of the future. (Photo: Colourbox)

2016.06.20 | AU Engineering

Large conference to prepare the agriculture of the future

The role of technology in the agriculture of the future will be scrutinised at the end of the month when Aarhus University hosts the International Conference on Agricultural Engineering 2016.

A team of Aarhus University engineering students has built a robot that can search for possible life on Jupiter’s moon Europa. They have now succeeded in being selected to compete next week in the 2016 MATE international ROV competition hosted by NASA in Houston. (Photo: Colourbox)
Pictured here is the team behind TOSCE. Following their competition achievements, they hope to sign a collaborative contract with NASA. (Photo: Lasse Thorfinn Jagd)
The underwater robot has been on a diet in recent weeks and has lost three kilos. This means a considerable reduction in expenses for rocket fuel. (Photo: Lasse Thorfinn Jagd)

2016.06.17 | AU Engineering

Underwater robot to explore Jupiter’s moon

A Danish team has been selected to compete next week in the 2016 MATE international ROV competition at NASA’s headquarters in Houston. The robot can search for possible life on Jupiter’s moon Europa.

The AU ENGINEERING 2025 plan will strengthen the field of engineering at Aarhus University. (Photo: AU Communication)

2016.06.16 | AU Engineering

AU ENGINEERING 2025 – strengthening the field of engineering at Aarhus University

The Aarhus University Board has approved the Senior Management Team’s recommendation to strengthen the field of engineering at Science and Technology (ST) until 2025. The Board’s decision means that Aarhus University (AU) supports the development of engineering with an amount of DKK 113 million altogether up to 2021 via the Senior Management…

Researchers at Aarhus University describe it as a breakthrough that they can now use artificial copies of allergens and thereby study the mechanisms of action behind anaphylaxis in individual patients. They have just used the method in the first major study with sera from a total of 115 insect allergy sufferers, and they found significant deficiencies in the current treatment. Photographed here is Edzard Spillner. (Photo: Lars Kruse)
Insect allergy today is treated with vaccines based on a purified form of natural venom. In the future, the vaccines may very well consist of artificial allergens that are carefully combined so that they match the individual patient’s specific allergy profile. (Photo: Colourbox)

2016.06.14 | AU Engineering

People allergic to insect venom need precision medical diagnosis and treatment

A team of researchers has elucidated individual profiles of allergy reactivity in patients that are not protected after treatment with immunotherapy. The aim is to improve medical treatment of people who are allergic to insect stings.

A group of engineering students have carried out a total of four successful and well-monitored rocket engine launches. They now have so much data that they expect to be able to optimise the engine so that they can launch the next rocket into orbit around the Earth. (Photo: Colourbox)
It started out mostly for fun a few years ago among a group of engineering students at Aarhus University. Since then, their tinkering in the laboratories has gained momentum, and researchers now estimate that the students’ latest version of a rocket engine could provide state-of-the-art results in rocket technology within a few years. (Photo: Gorm Andresen)

2016.06.10 | AU Engineering

Students will launch a rocket into space

After several years of work, a group of engineering students have now managed to carry out a total of four successful launches of a rocket engine on a test stand from a space laboratory.

By precisely recording the blood pressure of pregnant women as early as the 12th week, it is possible to indicate the risk of preeclampsia at a later stage of the pregnancy. Researchers have developed a telemedical solution that makes it possible to implement targeted screening programmes without leading to increased use of staff resources. (Photo: Colourbox)

2016.06.07 | AU Engineering

Smart sphygmomanometer provides early warning of preeclampsia

Researchers at Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital have developed an intelligent measuring station that very precisely records the blood pressure of pregnant women as early as the 12th week of pregnancy. This can help determine the risk of preeclampsia at a later stage of the pregnancy.