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Michael Misbih and Thomas Holm Nielsen have taught their computer to count the number of bees with mites. And the computer can do this quickly and accurately, without hurting as much as an antennae on the bees. (Photo: Jesper Bruun)

2018.07.05 | AU Engineering

Engineering students count parasitic mites in an instant

Parasitic mites are one of the main reasons why the death rate for honey bees in Denmark is increasing. Now, two engineering students have developed a system that makes it possible to map the extent of the problem, and at the same time reduce pesticide consumption.

[Translate to English:] Ditte Lund Beck (tv) og Rebecca Lork har skrevet et speciale, der kan sætte udsyn og privathed i studielejligheder på formel (Foto: Jesper Bruun)
Rebecca Lork er ikke i tvivl om, at udsigten fra hendes studielejlighed på et kollegium på Aarhus Ø har været med til at give hende 5½ gode år som ingeniørstuderende.  (Foto: Rebecca Lork)

2018.07.05 | AU Engineering

Can you measure quality of view?

Two engineering students have written a Master's thesis, which may influence the construction of student accommodation in the future. In collaboration with researchers, they have developed and tested a formula that makes it possible to calculate the quality of the view from small student flats.

Happy new masters of science in engineering. Now sunny holidays await. Photo: Henrik Olsen.
"As an engineer, you’re creating something of actual value. Something, that actually benefits other people," said Mathias Jessen, who graduated thursday as master of science in engineering. Photo: Henrik Olsen

2018.06.29 | AU Engineering

"Dream with your eyes open"

Yesterday, 85 students graduated as master of science in engineering from the Department of Engineering, Aarhus University.

Marcelo Dias is using structural instability in his own research. Photo: Lars Kruse

2018.06.29 | AU Engineering

Built on instability

Instability is a common feature in nature. But mankind is not yet really started to reap the benefits of nature's elastic and structural instabilities, that has spawned from eons of evolution.

Associate professor Luis Álvarez-Vallina (left) and postdoc Simon Lykkemark working on the anti-cancer ATTACK-molecule, that could have far reaching potential in curing cancer in the future. Photo: Jesper Bruun.
Graphic representation of ATTACK. The trimerisation domain is seen in the middle. At the bottom end are the three antibodies, each of which is intended to bind to cancer cells. At the top an immune-stimulating antibody captures T-cells. Graphics: Simon Lykkemark.

2018.06.28 | AU Engineering

Danish researchers invent anti-cancer molecule as a Lego kit

A new, smart molecule enables researchers to build exactly the antibody that works best for a given type of cancer. The researchers have high expectation for the molecule in future cancer treatment, as it also activates the body's own immune system against malignant cancer cells.

Researchers fracture heart valves with small high-pressure balloons in the laboratory. The aim is to calculate the exact minimum pressure for a defective heart valve to fracture  without damaging the surrounding tissue. The photo shows (from left) Jens Erik Nielsen-Kudsk, Aarhus University Hospital and Peter Johansen, associate professor, Department of Engineering, Aarhus University. (Photo: AU Lars Kruse)

2018.06.18 | AU Engineering

Danish researchers behind new treatment for heart-valve patients

Now patients can have their worn-out artificial heart valve replaced without major surgery. Together with physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, engineers from Aarhus University have developed and characterised a gentle method to fracture old implants and make room for new ones.

Much can be learned from the ancient Japanese art form origami, when it comes to designing modern metamaterials. (Photo: Lars Kruse, AU)

2018.06.15 | AU Engineering

Centuries-old art form generates completely new materials

Origami. For many people, the word means not much more than skilfully folding paper to resemble swans, frogs or other animals. But origami is much more. There are examples of origmai throughout the modern world, but it's likely that you won't notice all the things that are in fact inspired by this 17th century Japanese art form.

Dekan Niels Chr. Nielsen sammen med Johan T. Krogshave (tv) og Robert Søndergaard (th) med undervandsrobotten NorthROV på folkemødet. Foto: Jesper Bruun
På folkemødet er der mulighed for at se 3D-optagelser, som NorthROV har optaget, af enorme isbjerge under det arktiske vand. Foto: Jesper Bruun
Ingeniørteltet åbnede med et science show, der understregede vigtigheden af samarbejde inden for teknologiens verden. Foto: Jesper Bruun.

2018.06.18 | AU Engineering

Dean: "Education will solve the UN development goals"

The tent of engineering at the People's Meeting at Bornholm opened with fire, steam and praise to the country's engineering students.

AU Engineering er med i Techteltet på Folkemødet 2018. Her sætter vi  ingeniørens og teknologiens rolle i samfundet på dagsordenen. (Foto: DTU arkiv)

2018.06.18 | AU Engineering

AU Engineering at the People's Meeting 2018

The technology-based society of the future was on the agenda of the 2018 People's Meeting on Bornholm. Food technology and artificial intelligence were amongst the topics discussed in the tent of engineering from June 14 to 17.

Gaute Munch has been nominated for one of the world's most important inventor awards for his two decades of work with the LEGO Group on developing programmable toys for the children all over the world. (PHOTO: EPO archive)

2018.05.11 | AU Engineering

Engineering alumnus nominated for this year’s European Inventor Award

As a child, he has spent hundreds of hours on the playroom floor, playing with small plastic bricks. As an adult, he landed a dream job with the LEGO Group. His job was to develop programmable toys. Now he has been nominated for the European Invention Award - one of the world's most important inventor awards. This is the story about the electronic…

By knowing the risk of premature birth at a very early stage, doctors can use preventive measures that could greatly reduce the otherwise significant risk. Doctor and phD Christine Rohr Thomsen (left) is seen here with assistant professor Mogens Hinge conducting experiments. Photo: AU Foto.

2018.05.07 | AU Engineering

New technology to minimise the risk of premature birth

Premature birth is the most common cause of death among infants worldwide. Danish researchers are therefore working on a very special project that will make it possible to identify women at risk long before their child is born.

2018.04.11 | AU Engineering

Latest news from the world of engineering

Our new profile brochure has just been published. In the brochure, you can read all about the latest research in the field of engineering at Aarhus University, where we collaborate across national borders with industry and other research institutions to take technological developments to new heights.

Iceberg in Icefjord at Ilulissat off the east coast of Greenland. The light in the water on the left is the underwater robot.
Three happy engineering students back in Aarhus after a successful expedition to Greenland. In the course of just one semester, they have built an underwater robot that can explore icebergs below the ocean surface. The picture shows Johan T. Krogshave, Robert Søndergaard and Kristian K. Sahlholdt (Photo: Jesper Bruun)
An iceberg photographed under water.

2018.04.13 | AU Engineering

Underwater robot reveals surprising new knowledge about icebergs

Using an underwater robot they built themselves, a group of Danish engineering students have photographed a complete iceberg below the ocean surface. This is a breakthrough for international Arctic research.

Another record for AU Engineering was set for the number of visitors to U-days in early March, with more than 800 young people coming to learn more about our engineering programmes. Photo: AU Foto.

2018.03.26 | AU Engineering

Record number of applicants seeking engineering degree programmes in Aarhus

More than ever have applied for engineering programmes at Aarhus University via quota 2. Food and biotechnology are particularly popular.

Smart technologies are only really smart when they can talk together. This also applies to agriculture, where internet-connected machines will pave the way for "agriculture 4.0". Senior researcher Claus Grøn Sørensen is working on just that: getting IoT products from many different manufacturers to be able to talk seamlessly together.

2018.03.02 | AU Engineering

New project boosts the digital revolution in the agricultural sector

Digital agriculture has moved a significant step forward with the publication of a new software tool developed by Aarhus University with a number of international partners. The tool will promote real interoperability between agricultural machinery, sensors and software.

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