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Gaute Munch has been nominated for one of the world's most important inventor awards for his two decades of work with the LEGO Group on developing programmable toys for the children all over the world. (PHOTO: EPO archive)

2018.05.11 | AU Engineering

Engineering alumnus nominated for this year’s European Inventor Award

As a child, he has spent hundreds of hours on the playroom floor, playing with small plastic bricks. As an adult, he landed a dream job with the LEGO Group. His job was to develop programmable toys. Now he has been nominated for the European Invention Award - one of the world's most important inventor awards. This is the story about the electronic…

By knowing the risk of premature birth at a very early stage, doctors can use preventive measures that could greatly reduce the otherwise significant risk. Doctor and phD Christine Rohr Thomsen (left) is seen here with assistant professor Mogens Hinge conducting experiments. Photo: AU Foto.

2018.05.07 | AU Engineering

New technology to minimise the risk of premature birth

Premature birth is the most common cause of death among infants worldwide. Danish researchers are therefore working on a very special project that will make it possible to identify women at risk long before their child is born.

2018.04.11 | AU Engineering

Latest news from the world of engineering

Our new profile brochure has just been published. In the brochure, you can read all about the latest research in the field of engineering at Aarhus University, where we collaborate across national borders with industry and other research institutions to take technological developments to new heights.

Iceberg in Icefjord at Ilulissat off the east coast of Greenland. The light in the water on the left is the underwater robot.
Three happy engineering students back in Aarhus after a successful expedition to Greenland. In the course of just one semester, they have built an underwater robot that can explore icebergs below the ocean surface. The picture shows Johan T. Krogshave, Robert Søndergaard and Kristian K. Sahlholdt (Photo: Jesper Bruun)
An iceberg photographed under water.

2018.04.13 | AU Engineering

Underwater robot reveals surprising new knowledge about icebergs

Using an underwater robot they built themselves, a group of Danish engineering students have photographed a complete iceberg below the ocean surface. This is a breakthrough for international Arctic research.

Another record for AU Engineering was set for the number of visitors to U-days in early March, with more than 800 young people coming to learn more about our engineering programmes. Photo: AU Foto.

2018.03.26 | AU Engineering

Record number of applicants seeking engineering degree programmes in Aarhus

More than ever have applied for engineering programmes at Aarhus University via quota 2. Food and biotechnology are particularly popular.

Smart technologies are only really smart when they can talk together. This also applies to agriculture, where internet-connected machines will pave the way for "agriculture 4.0". Senior researcher Claus Grøn Sørensen is working on just that: getting IoT products from many different manufacturers to be able to talk seamlessly together.

2018.03.02 | AU Engineering

New project boosts the digital revolution in the agricultural sector

Digital agriculture has moved a significant step forward with the publication of a new software tool developed by Aarhus University with a number of international partners. The tool will promote real interoperability between agricultural machinery, sensors and software.

2018.02.06 | AU Engineering

Congratulations to a record crop of new engineers

Hundreds dressed up to the nines to mark the end of their engineering studies. An exciting life at work now awaits them - but also a big responsibility

2018.01.24 | AU Engineering

Poul Due Jensen Foundation pumps DKK 40 million into water technology research

With four donations totalling more than DKK 40 million, Aarhus University's new Centre for Water Technology (WATEC) is off to a flying start and headed for a place among the international elite within the field of research into sustainable water cycles.

Researchers have discovered a new approach for antibody-based treatment of allergy and asthma. It is nothing less than a breakthrough that could have a major impact on development of new medicine in years to come. The Photo shows Edzard Spillner (Photo: Lars Kruse)

2018.01.22 | AU Engineering

New research can put an end to allergic reactions

Researchers have found a new mechanism in which an antibody can prevent allergic reactions in a broad range of patients. It is a scientific breakthrough, which could pave the way for a far more effective allergy medicine.

Professor Christos Thomas Georgakis is one of the worlds's leading wave researchers. He is studying how the sea's movement impacts oil platforms in the North Sea. The aim is to reduce inspection and maintenance costs. (Photo: Lars Kruse)

2018.01.12 | AU Engineering

New knowledge about waves to keep oil platforms operational for longer

Open-sea trials will reveal to researchers how waves arise, develop and impact the surroundings. This will make it possible to keep oil platforms in the North Sea operational for longer.

Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen, Science and Technology, and Development Manager Kasper Lund, Google Aarhus, officially opened the ORBIT Lab on 13 December. Photo: Martin Gravgaard
There was plenty of opportunity to try out technologies, and students and entrepreneurs were on standby to show off their innovations. Photo: Martin Gravgaard
“We’ll solve the problems of today with the technology of tomorrow,” said ‘Lab Commander’ Kasper Løvborg Jensen at the opening. Photo: Martin Gravgaard
“Aarhus University’s motto is <em>Solidum petit in profundis</em> (We seek solid ground in the depths). The ORBIT Lab aims for exactly the opposite. You’ll reach up to the stars, where the sky knows no boundaries and neither does the cloud,” said Dean Niels Chr. Nielsen at the opening.

2017.12.17 | AU Engineering

How we solve the problems of today with the technology of tomorrow

The stage was set for inspiring ideas at the official opening of the ORBIT Lab on Wednesday 13 December, when Aarhus University staff and students were invited along with representatives from the business sector – and many interesting technological innovation projects were displayed.

"In this project, we have started a journey to construct a cognitive computing system as a proof of concept," says Associate Professor Farshad Moradi, Department of Engineering, Aarhus University.

2017.12.14 | AU Engineering

Building a computer like a human brain: a technological revolution

For decades computers have been growing exponentially in computational power. However, the current technology is nearing a threshold: computing simply requires too much power.

2017.12.12 | AU Engineering

Aarhus University opens large new innovation factory

Engineering students are full of good ideas that can help solve some of the world’s many problems. The Aarhus University School of Engineering is therefore kicking off a new initiative that – in collaboration with researchers and companies – will get the students’ ideas to flourish.

Grass can be turned into feed, fuel and valuable chemicals. But how do you optimise biomass and make the most efficient use of it for new products? Ib Johansen (left) and Morten Ambye-Jensen are spearheading the university’s research into biorefining technologies. (Photo: AU Communication)
By very precisely regulating pressure and temperature conditions, Ib Johansen can convert grass to oil in the present demonstration facility. The biomass is led through a 120-metre-long pipe, where it is heated to approximately 450 degrees and subjected to pressure corresponding to 350 bar. The process removes oxygen from the biomass and changes the relationship between hydrogen and carbon. (Photo: AU Communication)

2017.12.07 | AU Engineering

Researchers will turn grass into a gold mine

With a multi-million grant, researchers can speed up development of the world’s largest and most advanced biorefinery facility. Here they will convert ordinary grass to feed, food products, fuel and plastic.

Daniel Enrique Lucani Rötter is a new Sapere Aude research leader under the Danish Council for Independent Research. His appointment includes a grant to strengthen research into data compression and storage in the Internet of the future. (Photo: AU Communication)

2017.11.24 | AU Engineering

Sapere Aude grant for research into the Internet of the future

The Internet is undergoing a degree of change that only a few can imagine. The flow of information is in explosive growth, and this places extreme demands on the way we compress and store data. Researchers are now getting started on the creation of completely new conditions for communication between humans and things in the network.

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