Guest lecture: Optimization in liner shipping

Prof. David Pisinger, DTU Management Engineering.

2018.12.04 | Peter Gorm Larsen

Date Mon 10 Dec
Time 15:00 16:00
Location Room 114, building 5125, Finlandsgade 22, 8200 Aarhus N

Abstract
It is estimated that 90% of global trade is carried via the sea, and shipping is by far the most energy-efficient way of transportation. However, the shipping industry is responsible for 2.2% of the global CO2 emission, and an even larger emission of SOx, NOx and particles. Therefore, still more regulations are imposed on the emission, making it difficult for liner shipping companies to plan their operation.

In this talk we will address two important problems: Speed optimization and bunker planning.

Speed optimization of a complete liner shipping network makes it possible to generate a schedule of all vessels that minimizes fuel consts while maintaining short transportation times.

The bunker planning problem optimizes where and when to purchase fuel for a fleet of vessels, taking into account fluctuating prices at different locations. A unified model has been developed making it possible to plan bunkering for all vessels of a large shipping company up to one year in advance.

Results from real-life cases will be presented and it will be discussed how they can be used for strategic, tactical and operational planning. The talk is concluded by discussing future challenges within maritime shipping and the LINERLIB set of public benchmark instances.

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David Pisinger
David Pisinger, is professor in operations research at DTU Management Engineering, and adjoint professor at DIKU, University of Copenhagen. His research interests include Maritime optimization, Vehicle Routing, Railway optimization, Energy models, and Packing and cutting problems. He has been leading several research projects in maritime logistics, railway optimization, and packing and loading.

David received the Hedorfs Fonds prize for Transport Research 2013, and received the Teaching Prize 2016 at DTU Management. Over the years he has supervised more than 20 PhD students. Two of these have received the VeRoLog dissertation prize, and one has received the TSL dissertation prize.

Having a background in Knapsack Problems, David Pisinger can be recognized by always wearing a knapsack.

Lecture / talk