Biomedical Engineering

The research activities of the Biomedical Engineering group are divided into two main areas:

Cardiovascular mechanics and dynamics which cover in vitro experimental research on various clinical pathophysiological conditions, treatments and prosthesis.

Electrophysiological instrumentation and analysis which cover various neuro technologies comprising sensor development, instrumentation and signal processing methods.

WHAT IS BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Biomedical engineering is the application of engineering in medicine and biology. It has been around for thousands of years, which can be witnessed at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo where a handcrafted wooden prosthetic toe found on the mummy of Tabaketenmut can be seen. However, as technology evolved so did biomedical engineering. A few technological landmark examples include the discovery of the penetrating effect of X-ray by Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen (1895) establishing the foundation for the development of medical imaging, and the first recording of the ECG by Willem Einthoven (1903) which still is the most applied and clinically used recording today.

As technology further developed, biomedical engineering became more and more interdisciplinary including and combining the various scientific fields of medicine, biology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science and engineering (traditionally electrical and mechanical engineering).

RESEARCH IN THE BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING GROUP

At the Department of Engineering, research in biomedical engineering is based on applying engineering methods and scientific approaches to obtain new knowledge and technologies that can be used and applied for improvement and new designs of medical devices, treatments and diagnostic tools. Biomedical engineering is multidisciplinary and the research activities are, therefore, carried out in close collaboration with clinical departments, industry and other academic partners.

The interdisciplinary core-engineering areas include topics such as transducer design and development, front-end analogue hardware design, data acquisition, signal processing, material stress-strain characterisation and evaluation, various types of instrumentation, and development of physical and numerical models of physiological systems. So, the engineering disciplines involve Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mechanical and Materials Engineering and Biological and Chemical Engineering.

The research activities in the Biomedical Engineering group are divided into two main areas:

  • Cardiovascular mechanics and dynamics which cover in vitro experimental research on various clinical pathophysiological conditions, treatments and prosthesis.
  • Electrophysiological instrumentation and analysis which cover various neuro technologies comprising sensor development, instrumentation and signal processing methods.

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES

Based on these core activities, the Biomedical Engineering group also provides research-based courses to the graduate programme in Biomedical Engineering, which is anchored and administered within our group, as well as offering classes at the undergraduate programme in Healthcare Technology.

Aside from being involved in the educational area, the research laboratories also offer student projects (both undergraduate, graduate and PhD) and host both national and international researchers.