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Guest lecture: Joint Double-Seminar Bioscience and Bioengineering

Introducing a Center of Excellence: Center for Microbial Secondary Metabolites, CeMiSt. By Professor Lone Gram. Merging Microbial Ecology and Math. By Associate Professor Mikael Lenz Strube.

25.11.2019 | Heidi Søndergaard

Dato tir 10 dec
Tid 09:30 11:00
Sted Aarhus University, Auditorium G1 (1532-116)

Tuesday, 10 December 2019, 9:30 in Auditorium G1 (1532-116)


Start 09:30

Introducing a Center of Excellence: Center for Microbial Secondary Metabolites, CeMiSt

Professor Lone Gram
Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark

The purpose of CeMiSt is to unravel the (micro)biological role of microbial secondary metabolites in natural microbiological communities. Whilst some may serve as competitive weapons (e.g. antibiotics), others may act as signals, as cues or as nutrient sources. We have selected three microbial systems: marine algal/biofilm systems, grassy soils systems and black apples. Each of the three represent niches were particular (to us well-known) secondary metabolite producing microorganisms reside; roseobacters (marine systems), bacilli, pseudomonads and Streptomyces (soil systems) and filamentous fungi (black apples). We will study presence of organisms and compounds in the natural systems and develop (semi)synthetic microbial communities in which genetically manipulated microorganisms (devoid of or overexpressing secondary metabolites) can be introduced to study the effects of taxonomic and functional microbial diversity. We use a combination of classical microbiology, natural product chemistry, sequence based analyses and statistical analyses.


Intermission with Coffee & Cake


Start 10:15

Merging Microbial Ecology and Math

Associate Professor Mikael Lenz Strube
Department of Biotechnology and Biomedicine, Technical University of Denmark

Sequencing technologies are rapidly becoming the gold standard for microbial community profiling, allowing researchers to infer the composition and distribution of almost any microbiome found in nature. The scale of the data generated by these technologies is unfortunately growing to such a magnitude that manual analysis is unfeasible. Luckily, computer assisted methods exists for this exact task, including single- and multivariate statistical analysis along with mathematical modelling borrowed and extended from classical ecology. In the CeMiSt Center of Excellence, we are generating large amounts of microbial community data, and this talk will be focused on practical computational methods for inference of structure, dynamics and function of these communities.


Everybody is welcome!

It is also possible to join only one of the two seminars.

Organizers: Thomas Tørring (thomast@eng.au.dk) & Andreas Schramm (andreas.schramm@bios.au.dk)

Forelæsning / foredrag