Signal Processing

The research of the Signal Processing group is divided into four areas:

Geophysics which covers research on signal processing algorithms and instrument development for different airborne and ground based geophysical methods used to map groundwater, minerals and pollution. 

Audio systems which covers research on signal processing applied in audio systems both for controlling the emission of sound in loudspeaker systems and for detecting specific signatures of recorded sound.

Precision agriculture which covers research on autonomous farming equipment with e.g. obstacle detection based on inputs from computer vision systems and research on applications of drones with remote sensing systems.

Image processing which covers research on the application of computer vision systems and image processing. Examples include automatic identification and tracking of animals and insects.

WHAT IS SIGNAL PROCESSING

Signal processing is the name given to the very broad discipline of interacting with signals. Signal processing is at the heart of many of today’s well-known and appreciated technologies and examples are abound: When your smart phone is able to pinpoint your exact location in some remote area, the processing of the GPS signals received from satellites in space has been done. When you sit in an airplane and enjoy the silence offered by noise cancelling headphones, signal processing is at play. When a farmer reduces his use of pesticides because a computer with a camera automatically distinguishes between weed and crops, and gives orders to spray only the weed, signal processing is at play.

The field of signal processing has evolved tremendously over the past years and will continue to do so. One main driver of this is the ever evolving speed of computers. The processing power that would have been impossible a decade or two ago is now commonplace in consumer products. This development has also opened up for many new fields of research and applications.

At the core of a signal processing curriculum is the analysis and manipulation of a sampled time series such as an ECG signal or an audio signal. What is the frequency content and how can specific components of the signal be detected, enhanced or removed? From this foundation signal processing has expanded and now covers a multitude of areas e.g. image processing, machine learning, data mining and robotics, with applications in a vast number of areas.

RESEARCH IN THE SIGNAL PROCESSING GROUP

At the Department of Engineering, the research activities in signal processing are primarily focused on the application aspect. Most of the work is highly multidisciplinary and is done in collaboration with academic and industrial partners.

The main research activities currently span the following areas:

  • Geophysics. This covers research on signal processing algorithms and instrument development for different airborne and ground based geophysical methods used to map groundwater, minerals and pollution.
  • Audio systems. This covers research on signal processing applied in audio systems both for controlling the emission of sound in loudspeaker systems and for detecting specific signatures of recorded sound.
  • Precision agriculture. This covers research on autonomous farming equipment with e.g. obstacle detection based on inputs from computer vision systems and research on applications of drones with remote sensing systems.
  • Image processing. This covers research on the application of computer vision systems and image processing. Examples include automatic identification and tracking of animals and insect.

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES

The signal processing group provides research-based courses to the graduate programmes in electrical engineering and computer engineering. The courses are collected in the signal processing package which consists of the following courses:

Besides the core course activities at the master programme, the research staff also offers reading courses in signal processing and teaches classes on image processing, adaptive signal processing and applied linear algebra at bachelor level at Aarhus School of Engineering. The group offers student projects at the bachelor, master and PhD level.

WANT TO KNOW MORE?

Whether you are a company who wants to set up collaboration with the signal processing group or you are a student who wants to know more about the possibilities of suggesting a reading course or doing project or thesis work in the group, you are always welcome to contact one of the staff members for more information.